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Published bv the College in February, April, 

July, September, November (2 issues) 
Vol. 44, No. 1 February, 1961 



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NEW OPPORTUNITIES AT SWEET BRIAR 




SWEET BRIAR COLLEGE 



DORMITORY - DINING HALL 



CLARK, NEXSEN, 8 OWEN -ARCHITECTS 



NEW DORMITORY AND DINING HALL 



Sweet Briar is growing. For the sec- 
ond time in eight years, Sweet Briar's en- 
rollment will show a marked increase, 
with the expected completion of a new 
dormitory and dining hall in September, 
1962. Construction of this new build- 
ing is to begin shortly and when it is 
fully occupied the enrollment will reach 
650, an increase of 100 over the current 
figure and 200 over that of 1954. 



MARY REYNOLDS BABCOCK 
FINE ARTS CENTER 

Added impetus will be given to teach- 
ing and learning in music, art, drama, 
and writing when Sweet Briar's largest 
building — an auditorium and fine arts 
center — opens in September, 1961. 

Frequent cooperative productions, 
drawing on all the creative arts, are 
visualized as a practical reality in the 
new center, which will give ample and 
well-equipped accommodations to the 
music and art departments — each with 
studios, classrooms, and libraries; to the 
writers' workshop; and to the drama de- 
partment, which will have a wealth of 
facilities for all phases of theatre pro- 
duction 




The entire community is anticipating the potential 
advantages of having an excellent auditorium and lec- 
ture hall, with stage facilities for the presentation and 
production of student and professional drama, dance 
recitals, and a variety of musical events. 



ASIAN STUDIES PROGRAM 



New Oriental horizons are opening for Sweet 
Briar students, through the inauguration in Sep- 
tember, 1960, of a program of studies concerned 
with the countries and peoples of Asia. 

Student eagerness to learn about these im- 
portant areas and civilizations led to the estab- 
lishment of this program. It began with a credit 
course in Asian Studies, focused on India and 
Pakistan, being taught throughout this year by 
Professor Leslie Harris. 

Supplementing this course in the second se- 
mester is a series of weekly lectures on Burma, 



open to all students, by Daw Mya Sein, distin- 
guished Burmese professor of history and polit- 
ical science and a delegate to the 1960 United 
Nations General Assembly. She comes to Sweet 
Briar under a Whitney Foundation grant. 

Sweet Briar's Asian Studies program is a 
cooperative venture with two colleges in Lynch- 
burg, Virginia — Lynchburg College and Ran- 
dolph-Macon Woman's College — financed for 
three years by a grant from the Ford Foundation. 
Japan, China, and other Asian nations will be 
focal points for the program in ensuing years. 



TO HEADS of SCHOOLS and GUIDANCE COUNSELORS: 

We would like to call your attention, and that of prospective students, to new 
buildings and facilities which will soon make possible an increase of approximately 100 
in student enrollment at Sweet Briar College. 

This means that each year for the next three years we shall plan to accept about 
35 more new students, both freshmen and transfers with advanced standing. This may 
assist, in a small way, in meeting the mounting pressures for admission to college. 

Outstanding among Sweet Briar's new curriculum offerings is the Asian Studies 
program, to which we would also call your attention at this time.